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Oregon Forecast for September

By Scott Richmond

Oregon Rivers in General

What to Expect in September:

September is usually two months in one. The first half often has inconsistent fishing and feels like a continuation of August. In the second half, cooler weather settles in, with maybe a little rain, and trout and steelhead respond to the change with gusto.

Fall fishing will arrive about the second week of September. Even if we have high peak temperatures, it's not hot for long. The nights are cooler and longer, and that means lower water temperatures overall. It's all due to the earth's tilt on its axis, and that ain't gonna change. Enjoy!

Trout. Trout fishing improves in September, and not just because of cooler water. After a couple of months of caddis-dominated hatches, two mayflies return to prominence this month: mahogany duns and blue-winged olives.

The mahogany duns (Paraleptophelbia) create trout feeding activity in quiet bankwater because that's where the nymphs migrate before hatching. If you see trout languidly rising in slow water near the riverbank this month, you're probably witnessing a mahogany dun hatch. DON'T cast blindly. In this quiet water you'll spook the fish. Instead, watch the rises and pick a single trout. Use a downstream presentation so the fly reaches the fish before the leader and line.

The other mayfly that returns this month is the blue-winged olive. Hatches will be sporadic, but nymphs are active and are taken by trout more regularly than the duns, especially in riffly water; see A Little Known Two-Fer-One for tips on how to take advantage of this.

Tricos are marginally important in Oregon rivers, but on a few streams, such as the Williamson, there are enough of them to create selective feeding situations. The hatch will continue into early September.

Caddis continue to be active. Most of the remaining hatchers are size 18-20, but the huge October caddis makes its appearance late in the month. Some anglers discount the importance of October caddis to trout anglers. I'm not one of them. From the Deschutes to the Metolius to small streams such as the South Fork of the Walla Walla, this is an important hatch. Trout take pupa patterns as well as adults. When fishing an adult October caddis pattern, you'll probably catch more trout if you skate the fly across the surface than if you dead-drift it.

Salmonfly nymphs, which are never totally off the menu for trout, will become more important this month. Two-nymph rigs, with a salmonfly nymph on the point, will be very productive when no hatches are in progress.

Steelhead. For many anglers, steelhead will be the biggest news of September. Most major summer steelhead streams are hitting their prime. The strength of the run will vary from one year to the next. As the sun gets lower in the sky and temperatures cool, you can be productive for a longer time each day, instead of restricting yourself to the early morning and late evening.

No matter which species you pursue, you will find slippery rocks this month. A summer of low rivers and warm sunshine will have encouraged thick coats of algae on many submerged boulders. Watch your step, and be prepared to fall in.



Oregon Lakes in General

What to Expect in September:

One key to September lake fishing is understanding the needs of different trout species. For example, brown trout will move toward inlet and outlet streams in preparation for fall spawning. Once they're in their spawning mode, though, leave them alone.

Want to know where to look for brookies this month? Any shallow place that has rocky structures or gravel. They, too, are getting ready to spawn. Unlike browns and rainbows, brook trout can spawn in stillwater (that's because they're a char, not a trout).

Rainbow trout, on the other hand, are spring spawners, so they will wait several months before looking for a place to propagate themselves. But they are always searching for good water conditions. So in lakes where the water cools off, they'll scatter and be hard to locate. In other lakes, the level will have dropped, the water is warm, and rainbows will look for cool water sources, such as springs, inlets, and deeper water.

The major trout foods in stillwaters this month are midges (mornings and evenings, primarily) and Callibaetis. Woolly Buggers and leech patterns will continue to produce, too.

Callibaetis hatches usually fade in intensity as summer progresses, and almost grind to a halt in August. But they often have a resurgence around mid-September. These late hatches are usually size 16 insects, and they are a little darker than the Callibaetis you saw earlier in the year. Carry Callibaetis Cripples and Sparkle Duns for the hatch; Hen Spinners for the spinner fall; Flashback Pheasant Tails for the nymphs.



Chickahominy Reservoir

What to Expect in September:

Fishing should improve as the water cools off.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Chickahominy Reservoir report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Clackamas River

What to Expect in September:

Coho salmon should arrive soon, and will head upstream to Eagle Creek. Coho can be caught with methods similar to steelhead traditional tactics, except you can find coho in somewhat slower water and they will chase a fly. So stay alert as you retrieve, because they might grab your fly right at your feet. And manage your loose line.

Crowds can be thick at the first riffle upstream from the Willamette, so seek some other water if you don't enjoy fishing shoulder-to-shoulder.

Steelhead will be stacked up near the hatchery at McIver. Fresh fish should enter the lower river when it rains.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Clackamas River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Crane Prairie Reservoir

What to Expect in September:

Midges and leech patterns are the ticket at this time of year, with a few caddis pupa imitations thrown in, and maybe a Callibaetis hatch or spinner fall. When using mide pupa patterns, select size 18-20 flies. The best fishing will be from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

If the water is warm, fish will stack up in the Deschutes and Cultus channels and around the Rocky Point area. You might pick up trout by wind drifting Woolly Buggers at the mouths of the channels. Brown, dark olive, or yellow-olive are good colors.

One productive tactic is to slowly retrieve a Blood Midge on a long leader (15 feet minimum, maybe more) with a floating line (no indicator) so the fly creeps near the bottom. You'll need a floating line if you retrieve this slowly because even an intermediate will sink too fast. This tactic can also work with a size 16 Pheasant Tail.

As the lake begins to cool, trout will scatter. Keep moving when this happens. The trout are there; keep hunting, and don't give up.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Crane Prairie Reservoir report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Crooked River

What to Expect in September:

September is usually a good rebound month on the Crooked. Expect heavy weed growth, especially in the slow-current areas.

If you go, you might try size 20 (and smaller) black nymphs and midge patterns. A few tan caddis are also present. Blue-winged olives could become more important as the month progresses. Sparkle Duns and Baetis Cripples as well as size 18 Gold Ribbed Hares Ears or Pheasant Tails are good for the blue-wings. If you take a close look at the mature BWO nymphs this month, you'll see that most of them have two light colored bands on the abdomen. That's why I recommend the Gold Ribbed Hares Ear over the Pheasant Tail at this time of year. Mike Mercer's Micro Mayfly is another great nymph pattern. Expect hatches of mahogany duns this month. Look for them in the quiet margins of the river.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Crooked River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Davis Lake

What to Expect in September:

Callibaetis hatches will pick up again near the end of the month. They can start in mid-morning and last until afternoon. Evenings will be ruled by midge hatches.

Look for bass at the north end near the weed beds. Big deer hair poppers work well in low-light conditions.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Davis Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Deschutes River, Lower

What to Expect in September:

You should soon find decent steelhead fishing from Macks to Sherars Falls. By the end of the month, it should be good in the Maupin area, with a few fish all the way up to Warm Springs.

Nothing special needs to be said about the steelheading in September--no special tactics, no trick flies, no secret spots. Just get out there and do it. A combination of traditional tactics and indicator tactics will cover most situations.

There are seven prime types of steelhead water on the Deschutes. They are (in order of importance):

  1. Transition water
  2. Runs
  3. Tailouts
  4. Current breaks (places where a line of rocks breaks the current)
  5. Structure water (ledges and big rock gardens)
  6. Current sandwiches (slow water between two faster currents)
  7. Pocket water (small, one-fish holding areas near a single boulder or depression in the bottom)
  8. Bankside troughs (deep water of the right speed that is near the bank and overhung with alder branches).

Most anglers only fish the first two or three. If you want to find water that's unmolested by other anglers, expand your vision to include other types of steelhead holding water.

Trout fishing should keep getting better all month. The water cools off as the nights grow longer. The sun gets lower. New hatches start up. Anglers can still find hatches of caddis, primarily saddle-case caddis (Glossosoma). This time of year, take along some gray-bodied Soft Hackles in sizes 16 and 18. These can be excellent producers during afternoon caddis hatches.

You'll also find spotted caddis and green caddis hatching in September. Later in the month, look for hatches of October caddis (Dicosmoecus). These big guys don't hatch like other caddis. The pupa crawls out of the water at night, then the adult emerges on dry land, kind of like a stonefly. So a size-8 Stimulator or Clarks Stonefly with a pale-orange body (smaller and less gaudy than a salmonfly imitation) can produce when cast near the bank over water that's 2-4 feet deep and flowing at a moderate pace, especially if the bottom is rocky. Cloudy days seem to be best. While a drag-free drift can take trout, the best strikes can come when you skate the dry fly across the surface. To do this, cast down-and-across and just let the fly swing on the surface. It's a wet-fly swing, but with a dry fly. October caddis pupa patterns can be very productive when presented near the bottom.

This month many evening rises are to midges, and you'll need to match the size and color of the natural insect. Carry a seine so you can examine whatever is drifting down the river. Midge fishing is best in quiet runs, in backeddies, and near rocky banks that create mini-eddies. You'll find whitefish feeding in the slackwater areas, and trout where there's more current; sometimes only a couple of feet will separate the two species of fish. A midge pupa pattern is usually the best choice during a midge hatch.

Beginning around mid-month, look for hatches of mahogany duns in the late morning to evening hours. These mayflies hatch in the slow margins, so don't blind cast--you'll put the trout down if you do. Pick a rising trout and cast to it with a downstream presentation.

Size 20 blue-winged olives will also be hatching this month. Craneflies are another option in September.

The White River can be an occasional problem on the lower Deschutes. Warm weather or heavy rain causes this river to spew glacial silt into the Deschutes. When it's bad, it's really bad; you can't fish from the confluence (between Maupin and Sherars Falls) and the mouth of the Deschutes. Baring heavy rain falls on Mt. Hood (possible) or a heat wave (not likely) it probably won't affect your September fishing. If you're concerned, check with a local source, such as Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop or Deschutes Angler Fly Shop; both stores are in Maupin.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Deschutes River, Lower report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Deschutes River, Upper

What to Expect in September:

The river closes above Wickiup Reservoir at the end of August. Below Wickiup, you'll probably find better fishing below the Fall River confluence. Look for evening hatches of caddis. Size 14-16 Elk Hair Caddis or Parachute Caddis should cover most situations. The Parachute Caddis works best in slow sections. Use flies with tan or brown bodies.

Besides rainbow trout, the upper Deschutes has some enormous brown trout (5-10 pounds, some even bigger). They're unlikely to rise for your caddis patterns, but if you cast a large Zonker or other streamer near the bank and retrieve it, you might tie into a real trophy. The best brown trout fishing will be near dusk.

This part of the river is best fished from a boat, but there are several good bank-fishing spots.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Deschutes River, Upper report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



East Lake

What to Expect in September:

Look for midday (10 a.m. to 3 p.m.) hatches of Callibaetis. Both dry flies and nymphs are good choices to pick up brown trout, rainbows, and atlantic salmon. Emerger patterns such as the Callibaetis Cripple (my favorite) or dun imitations, such as the Sparkle Dun, are very productive during the hatch. You can also do well with an intermediate line when you use a slow retrieve of a Flashback Callibaetis.

Sometimes a streamer such as a Zonker or Woolly Bugger will pick up brown trout or rainbows when fished from an intermediate line; your best chances will be during low light periods such as dawn and dusk.

As the month moves on, afternoon and evening fishing will be best as the mornings can be pretty chilly; Paulina Peak not in Oregon's banana belt.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the East Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Fall River

What to Expect in September:

This spring-fed river stays cool, regardless of midday heat. Evenings and mornings are prime times, with midges predominating. A Sprout Midge is a great emerger pattern for this spring creek. Griffiths Gnats also work well as an adult pattern. For most midge fishing, you will need a 6X or 7X tippet.

Look for September hatches of mahogany duns. See the Mahogany Duns for tips on this hatch.

Terrestrials are also a factor on this river, so you might try an Ant or a Parachute Hopper. Margin areas will be the most productive places to cast these flies. I've watched numerous Fall River trout ease out from under the bank to take a fly that was drifting half an inch from the overhanging grass. I've also watched them NOT come out from the same spot when the fly was six inches from the grass. The closer you get to the bank, the better your chances.

You can also do well this month with small (size 16-18) caddis patterns. Small blue-winged olive emerger patterns, such as Baetis Cripple and size 18-20 olive Sparkle Duns, should be in your fly box, too. Expect pale morning dun hatches as well.

When nothing is hatching, go with a standard nymph such as a Pheasant Tail, tan San Juan Worm, etc.

Prime areas are below the falls, around the hatchery, and near the campground at the headwaters.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Fall River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Grande Ronde River

What to Expect in September:

Cooler weather may draw some fish out of the Snake River and into the 'Ronde. The river opens for steelhead fishing on September 1, and there may be a few fish present in the lower reaches in Washington, and maybe even around Troy--but not too many; most of the fish will show up in late September and in October.

If the rains come and the fish start to move, the Grande Ronde can be a lot of fun. There's nothing special about Grande Ronde steelheading techniques. If you like traditional tactics, this is your river. Holding water is fairly easy to recognize if you've had any experience with steelheading. The river is not huge, and intimacy is part of its appeal.

Because the Grande Ronde will be cooling down, some anglers will go deep with sink-tip lines and chartreuse and purple Marabous near the end of the month--if there's been enough rain to make "deep" a possibility. Other anglers, however, feel the Grande Ronde fishes fine with a floating line even when it's cool; they'll tie Muddlers, Bombers, Green Butt Skunks, or Streetwalkers to their tippets. The best fishing is usually from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

For more tips, details, and map, see the article Grande Ronde River.

If you travel to this delightful stream, get both Oregon and Washington fishing licenses; there's a lot of good water on both sides of the border.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Grande Ronde River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Hosmer Lake

What to Expect in September:

The lake's remaining brook trout will become more active as fall approaches, and the atlantic salmon are suckers for a moving white fly. A white Woolly Bugger or similar pattern should work well for the atlantics.

Large green Woolly Buggers can also be effective, and you might get some fish during a Callibaetis or midge hatch, or stick one with a damselfly adult, or find a remnant traveling sedge. But September is mostly a moving-white-fly time. Later in the month, you'll probably find the best fishing after 4:00 in the afternoon.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Hosmer Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Klamath Lake

What to Expect in September:

The best places to look for big fish are Pelican Bay near the springs not far from Rocky Point, up in the creeks (Recreation, Crystal, Harriman), and the mouth of the Wood River. Seal Buggers in brown, black, and burgundy should work well, especially near dawn and dusk. If the Seal Buggers don't do it for you, try small size 18-20 Soft Hackles, Flashback Callibaetis, and other small nymphs. Use them during the daylight hours with a slow retrieve and a clear intermediate line. If you're not finding fish, vary your retrieve until you find what works. Don't stay too long in one spot; you've got to keep moving on this lake.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Klamath Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Klamath River

What to Expect in September:

The Klamath River below the JC Boyle Powerhouse is a consistent producer of trout. The road below Boyle is extremely rough, but the slow, bumpy drive can be worth it. There are large numbers of 10-16 inch wild rainbows. Because the river is managed for power generation, the water level fluctuates several times a day, with high flows corresponding to peak power generation times in the morning and evening. The trout are used to these changes, though. You can fish during the higher flow times, but the trout will move around and scatter. They're not all in a barrel, like they can be when the water is low.

At this time of year, you should carry hopper patterns and cast them near bank where the sun is on the water. Late in September, you may find October caddis in the bushes. If so, a size 8 orange Stimulator or similar fly should generate rises. If the trout prove reluctant, try skating the fly. Attractors such as Royal Wulffs or any other bushy fly are also productive at times, especially in fast water.

Some nymphs to carry down here are salmonfly nymphs and caddis pupa patterns, such as the Z Wing Caddis and Sparkle Pupa, in size 14-16.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Klamath River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Lava Lake

What to Expect in September:

The weed beds in front of the resort and along the western shore are good places to fly fish for trout. Trout should become more surface-oriented as the water cools. Midges, Woolly Buggers, and leech imitations should get you some grabs. Look for hatches and spinner falls of Callibaetis--they always have a last big hatch before the end of the season.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Lava Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Mann Lake

What to Expect in September:

As desert temperatures cool down, Mann might be worth a look this month. Try large brown nymphs or streamers about size 6-8 . Vary the retrieve; you might find that a very fast retrieve works best.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Mann Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



McKenzie River

What to Expect in September:

Early September is an in-between time on this river. Trout are awaiting hatches of pale morning duns, blue-winged olives, October caddis, gray drakes, and mahogany duns. They're also waiting for salmon to start spawning so they can scarf-up drifting eggs.

But while they wait, they're not too eager to chase down food--or imitations of food--until the hatches pop and the salmon get it on. That can take another week or two or three. When the waiting is over, though, fishing should be excellent.

Blue-winged olives will be hatching this month, with increasing intensity as the month progresses. Caddis hatches are improving. You can also do well with attractor patterns such as Royal Wulffs and Parachute Adams in size 14-16. October caddis will appear later this month.

The McKenzie a strong run of spring salmon, and they should start spawning late in the month. That will create a fishing opportunity for fly anglers. Don't target the salmon, though. Cast your fly for the trout and steelhead that gather behind spawners and take spilled eggs that drift in the current. Some anglers feel that glue-gun eggs work better than the traditional Glo-Bug style of Egg Fly. Use a hot-glue gun and sticks of glue in various colors (Haretron makes them for fly fishers). Or simplify your life and use Alaska-style beads; it's still a fly; really.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the McKenzie River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Metolius River

What to Expect in September:

You'll still find some golden stoneflies in the upper part of the river this month. A few pale morning duns may be found as well. Both hatches are on the way out.

These hatches will be replaced by microcaddis, mahogany duns, flavs, and blue-winged olives. See Mahogany Duns for details and tips on mahogany duns.

Flavs are the small western green drake (Drunella flavilinea or Drunella coloradensis; the two species are hard to tell apart). They should show up around mid-month. Flavs are the smaller cousins of the big green drakes (Drunella grandis). Use the same patterns as for the big green drakes (Poxyback Green Drake for nymphs, Green Drake Cripple for duns) but in sizes 10-12. This hatch occurs from the canyon area (below Pine Rest campground) on downstream.

Expect to see blue-winged olives on the river this month. Use a size-18 Sparkle Dun, Baetis Cripple, or Parachute Baetis during the hatch, and a Pheasant Tail or gold-ribbed Hares Ear nymph when there is no hatch. If you hang around until evening, expect spinner falls of blue-winged olives; a size-18 Rusty Spinner should do the trick.

Some size 14-18 caddis can be expected near dusk, with the smaller caddis being dominant. Evening fly anglers should try a size-18 olive or gray X Caddis.

An overlooked hatch here is yellow sallies. They can hang around for most of September. A size 14-16 Parachute Caddis or equivalent, with an olive body, will imitate them. Some October caddis may be active by the end of the month.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Metolius River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Owyhee River, Lower

What to Expect in September:

Hoppers cast near the bank are a good early-September strategy. Midges and blue-winged olives will hatch this month. You can also pick up browns on leeches and Woolly Buggers. Don't be put off by the turbid water. Brown trout are found in the slackwater pools.

The upper part of the lower Owyhee is rich in mahogany duns, but the hatch seems to start later in the year. It is possible that you'll see a few this month, however.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Owyhee River, Lower report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Rogue River, Upper

What to Expect in September:

September is usually a good month for steelheaders. This month and next, part of the Upper Rogue is fly-angling only; that means regular fly gear or bubble/fly rigs. That also means NO weight on the leader, so leave the split-shot in the bag.

If the river is high, it's a good time to use traditional tactics as well as indicator tactics. A higher level will spread out the fish, and the warmer water will make them more willing to take a swinging fly.

Sometime in mid- to late-September, the Corps of Engineers will drop the output from Lost Creek Dam to around 1,000 cfs. Steelheading gets even better at that time. The water will be cooler and the fish will be more concentrated. Indicator tactics will work best then.

The Rogue is an unusual river, and its steelhead often feed like trout. A favorite meal is caddis pupae. That's why a Big Bird fly dead-drifted near the bottom can be a big producer in fall.

Once the salmon go on their redds (possible late in the month), egg flies will be the best bet.

If the flows drop to around 1,000 cfs, boating can be tricky in some of the areas below Shady Cove. Passage through Rattlesnake Rapids is especially "technical" in low water. If you're new to the river, you might want to take your first boat trip with someone who knows this section.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Rogue River, Upper report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Sandy River

What to Expect in September:

Cooler weather after mid-month should reduce the amount of glacial silt coming down the Sandy. Summer steelheading could improve at that time. Coho salmon should start to arrive in late September.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Sandy River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Umpqua River, North Fork

What to Expect in September:

A little cooler weather combined with some rain should turn the fish on. At the beginning of September, your best fishing will be in the early morning (all days) and evening (when it's not hot). But as the sun gets lower, the canyon will be more shaded and you can fish for more of the day.

If you are new to this river, or you just want to learn to fish it better, consider hiring a guide. The North Umpqua's structure makes it a tricky river to learn how to fish. Guides are almost always a benefit, on any water, but they are particularly so on the North Umpqua.

Remember, no weighted flies.

As more rain falls, many of the steelhead will head for spawning tributaries, but there should still be fish in the river and they will be more active once some rain falls.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Umpqua River, North Fork report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Williamson River

What to Expect in September:

There should be fishable numbers of big migratory trout still below Chiloquin, but by this time of year they're well-fed and tired of seeing anglers and artificial flies. They'll soon be on the move, and most of them will be above Chiloquin by the end of the month.

Below Chiloquin, expect trico hatches in the morning and caddis in the evening. The hatches bring 10-17 inch resident trout to the surface, but few of the big migratory rainbows come to the top. You'll need high-floating size 22 imitations and a 7X tippet for the trico hatch.

For the big fish, a size 8-10 olive, brown, or burgundy leech works best. A Blood Midge in size 18 can work well, too, as does a Soft Hackle pattern. Cast down-and-across, then retrieve your fly with short two-inch pulls.

Above Chiloquin, the tactics aren't much changed, but the fishing is more difficult. The regs don't permit fishing from a boat and nearly all the riverbank is private property. And the blasted trout like to hang out where the river is deep and you can't cast to them.

Approach the prime runs carefully and stay as far back as you can; practice your distance casting before you come here.

This is a difficult river to fish well, and a guide is a good idea for those who are unfamiliar with the river and its ways.

For more on September tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Williamson River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Central Region

What to Expect in September:

It's still a great month to strap a float tube onto your back and head for the high lakes, but keep a weather-eye out, especially near the end of the month. Check out Fishing in Oregon for good destinations. Then check in with the local US Forest Service Ranger Station for trail conditions. Gorge Fly Shop in Hood River is a good source of information for the northern Oregon Cascades. Timberline Emergers, midge pupa, Griffiths Gnats, and small Woolly Buggers are often good choices on these lakes.



Willamette Region

What to Expect in September:

The North Fork of the Middle Fork of the Willamette is a delightful small stream with wild trout. It's near Oakridge and Eugene.




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