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Oregon Forecast for June

By Scott Richmond

Oregon Rivers in General

What to Expect in June:

Early June is usually a damp and uncertain time for Oregon weather, especially on the west side of the Cascades, and particularly in the northern part of that sector. If it's time for Portland's Rose Festival, don't leave your raincoat at home. Stable, summery weather doesn't start until the fifth of July.

So be prepared for anything this month!

The salmonfly hatch should be in full-steam on the lower Deschutes, but just starting on a few other rivers. Most rivers that have salmonflies also have golden stoneflies, although there are exceptions. When both bugs are available, trout usually prefer the goldens, so be sure to carry size 6-8 patterns in golden stonefly colors as well as big size 4-6 orange salmonflies imitations.

If you find trout unreceptive to your salmonfly/golden stonefly offerings, try a submerged adult, such as the Titanic Stone, presented on a surface swing. For other details on fishing the salmonfly hatch, see Fishing the Salmonfly Hatch.

The big bugs aren't the only things going down the river this month. There are other hatches, and there are many times that trout will bypass a salmonfly and sip tiny PMDs or caddis instead.

Pale morning duns hatch in profusion on some rivers, and while trout get very selective on them, it's not a difficult hatch to match. Duns and emergers will both catch trout. Often, trout will switch from nymphs to emergers to duns, lingering longer on each stage than most anglers expect. A size 18 Parachute PMD or Sparkle Dun works just dandy when trout are on the rise. On very clear, slow streams you should switch to a CDC Cripple, PMD Cripple, or No Hackle with a pale yellow body. In this latter case you'll probably need to use a 6X or 7X tippet and a downstream presentation so the fly reaches the trout before the leader. No Hackles don't hold up very long; two or three fish, and the fly is too shredded to use any more, so the Cripples are preferred (by fly anglers, at least!).

Yellow quills (Epeorus mayflies) have a surprising habit: the dun generally emerges underwater. The dun then floats to the surface, where it dries its wings. In our area, trout prefer to take them while they're still underwater and shun the duns on top. Therefore a good fly choice is a yellow-bodied Soft Hackle in size 14 or 16 or a downwing wet fly. Some anglers confuse this hatch with the PMDs because they occur at the same season and both insects are yellow. The Epeorus, however, is bigger and has yellow wings, rather than smoky gray. Epeorus nymphs live in riffles, so duns (and trout) are usually found just downstream from a patch of whitewater.

Pale evening duns are members of the clinger group of mayflies, hence they are usually found hatching near riffly water. They have a yellow body that is a bit more intense in color than a PMD, and the wings are tan. Try a size 12-16 Light Cahill or yellow-bodied Sparkle Dun to match it.

Saddle-case caddis, spotted caddis, and green caddis are all June events, too.

Steelhead are starting to move into coastal streams that support summer-run fish, such as the Wilson and Siletz. They should soon reach fishable numbers. It's still too early to find many fish in the Deschutes and North Umpqua, which usually don't turn on until mid-July. The Hood River gets an early run of summer steelhead.



Oregon Lakes in General

What to Expect in June:

Callibaetis mayfly hatches will be common on many lakes this month. Hatches usually occur late-morning to mid-afternoon. For several hours before the hatch, trout will feed on swimming nymphs. Cast your fly and retrieve it very slowly--extremely slowly, incredibly slowly, half-an-inch-a-second slowly--using an intermediate line with a long leader. A Flashback Pheasant Tail, size 14, should work quite well. During the hatch use a Callibaetis Cripple, Sparkle Dun, or Comparadun and a floating line. If the wind is too strong for a surface fly, go back to the Pheasant Tail.

Trout will also be feeding on midges. Look for hatches at midday and in the evening, and carry midge pupa patterns in a variety of colors including tan, brown, black, and olive. The static midge tactic should work well most of the time. An adult midge pattern, such as a Griffiths Gnat, can work well, too. In my experience, the productivity of a Griffiths Gnat is in proportion to the elevation of the lake: the higher up the mountain I am, the better the Gnat works. I've never met anyone else who makes this claim, but I still believe it.

With warmer water, dragonfly and damselfly nymphs become active and are taken by trout and other fish. Dougs Damsels and Marabou Damsels work well for the latter.

It's hard to go wrong with a Woolly Bugger or Seal Bugger on a slow-sinking line, such as an intermediate or Type 2.



Chickahominy Reservoir

What to Expect in June:

You can do well with count-down-and-retrieve tactics using an olive Woolly Bugger, dragonfly nymph, or damselfly nymph. Windy days will roil the water, resulting in turbid conditions. When it gets like that, you can still catch trout, but you might want to move to a large, black streamer--something that has a profile and moves some water.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Chickahominy Reservoir report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Clackamas River

What to Expect in June:

Summer steelhead can be found in the Clackamas this month. Depending on the weather pattern, the river can be in and out of shape in June, so watch the river levels. Look for 12.0-13.5 feet on the Estacada gage. Sometimes the water can be surprisingly high in early June, then drop quickly to low levels when the runoff season has ended. Thus you might start the month with a sink-tip line and end it with a floater as the level drops and the temperature rises.

Steelhead can be found throughout the river, but eventually they all stack-up below the fish hatchery at McIver Park. It can be a crowded and sometimes unpleasant fishery, but if you get there early in the morning you'll have a good shot at some hatchery steelhead.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Clackamas River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Crane Prairie Reservoir

What to Expect in June:

Early June is usually a poor time here, especially if high water has the trout scattered all over the lake. Cool conditions can also slow the fishing.

Small green streamers are good patterns for June, and don't forget the ants! Big size 10 carpenter ants blow out of the trees and onto the water. Watch, too, for hatches of midges, Callibaetis, and caddis. Damselfly nymphs should start to work well late in the month. Cold weather will slow fishing here, and warm weather will kick-start the hatches. As always, retrieve your flies extremely slowly in this lake.

If you visit Crane, set your expectations: you might pick up a big fish or two if you look for them and spend a lot of time on the water. If you think you're going to sit in one place and catch a bunch of big trout, you'll be disappointed.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Crane Prairie Reservoir report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Crooked River

What to Expect in June:

The major action this month will include pale morning duns, size 16 (brown) caddis, and a brownish-olive mayfly in size 16. The pale morning duns will be strongest when the weather stabilizes, which is usually not until late in the month.

That that old traditional pattern, the Renegade, paired with a red Lightning Bug in size 18 can be a deadly combination in June. The Lightning Bug is generic enough that it could represent most anything that lives in the river.

Your fly box should include size 18 A. P. Blacks, size 18 beadhead Pheasant Tails, and similar small nymphs. Size 14-18 Scuds are also good flies to carry this month.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Crooked River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Davis Lake

What to Expect in June:

Trout will be eager for Callibaetis hatches and midge hatches. An olive size 8-10 Woolly Bugger can be productive, too; try wind drifting in large open parts of the lake.

Bass fishing near the reeds at the north end will improve as the bass come off their spawn. During the full moon cycle, your best topwater action will come from near dusk to one hour after sunset (the end of legal fishing) and from one hour before sunrise (the start of legal fishing) until the sun is out.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Davis Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Deschutes River, Lower

What to Expect in June:

Anglers should still keep an eye on the river gage and watch for sudden spikes. Fishing is best when the level is steady, dropping, or changing slowly. If the flow gets above 6,500 cfs (Madras gage), there are not a lot of places to find trout. Adult salmonflies should be throughout the river at this time, but if May was cool the hatch will have started late and the fish can still be looking down more than up. Golden stoneflies will probably be in the Maupin area in early June, but if the hatch started early they may already be done. These two big bugs get most of the attention this month. See Fishing the Salmonfly Hatch for advice on fishing this hatch.

The closer to you get to Warm Springs, the fewer golden stones you'll see. The closer you get to the mouth, the fewer salmonflies you'll see. Trout usually prefer the goldens to the salmonflies when both are available.

I've tried a number of salmonfly patterns, and in my opinion it's hard to beat a Clarks Stonefly. The Clarks Stonefly works well on the soft bankwater, lands gently on the water, casts more accurately than other stonefly patterns, and--due to its light weight--lets you use a finer tippet. It's also a really easy fly to tie. For some other good patterns, see Graduate School Stoneflies.

When casting salmonfly patterns, remember that most of the action is near the bank. Drift your fly through quiet water that is near overhanging vegetation; or water that is two-four feet deep and flowing over boulders; or pocket water just behind boulders; or current seams where fast water meets slow; or drop-offs below riffles; or riffly water near deeper water.

In the hatch's late stages, you'll probably do best with low-riding patterns. Take a look at the Titanic Stone for a sunken-adult pattern. This can be very effective at the end of the salmonfly/golden stonefly cycle.

Salmonflies and golden stones are not the only game in town, though. Some of the best caddis fishing I ever had on this river was in the middle of the salmonfly season; trout ignored my salmonfly imitations, but climbed all over a size 16 Soft Hackle.

The spotted caddis (aka Hydropsyche or net spinner) are hatching this month. See Net Spinning Caddis for details on this insect. Carry Sparkle Pupas in size 12-14 (olive body, tan shroud), size 12-14 Soft Hackles with an olive body, size 14 Elk Hair Caddis or X Caddis with an brown body, and size 14 Diving Caddis with a dark body and wing. By mid-month, you can expect caddis pupa imitations to work in the morning. Try patterns such as a size 16 Sparkle Pupa. Other good morning patterns for mid-month are size 18 Pheasant Tails and green drake nymphs such as the Poxyback Green Drake.

Look, too, for hatches of pale morning duns (PMDs). These occur at midday. A size 18 Parachute PMD or Sparkle Dun does well for the PMDs.

Yellow quills (Epeorus mayflies) are sometimes confused with PMDs. The Epeorus are bigger and have a yellow wing. The duns are seldom targeted by trout. Instead, use a size 12-14 yellow-bodied Soft Hackle presented with a surface swing.

Pale evening duns are another midday, mid-month event. They occur near riffles. Try a size 12-16 Light Cahill for the pale evening duns.

Yellow sallies are a June event here, too. Size 14-16 patterns are needed for the yellow sallies; see Beyond the Big Stones. Most of the action is in the evening.

From mid-month on, a size 14 Soft Hackle can be very productive in the evenings.

No matter which hatch you're fishing, most of the action will be near the bank or in the backeddies. An exception is evening midge activity, which can be offer excellent fishing. Use a size 18-20 black midge pupa near dusk. When you see trout quietly feeding near the surface in backeddies and quiet runs at dusk, they're usually taking midges.

If you've read all of the above, you've no doubt concluded that you need a big fly box for June; there's a lot happening on the Deschutes this month. The successful anglers are the ones who keep moving and keep changing flies to match shifting conditions.

With summer weather, the White River could become a problem: very hot days will cause glacial melt that will ship tons of silt down the White River. Alternatively, heavy rains on the east slope of Mt. Hood will raise the White and silt will be borne downriver. In either case, the Deschutes--from its confluence with the White all the way to the Columbia--can become too murky for good fishing. It can take three or four days for the river to clear up after one of these "events." The best advice is to check with a local source.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Deschutes River, Lower report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Deschutes River, Upper

What to Expect in June:

Evening caddis activity will get trout moving on the upper Deschutes this month. The area between Crane Prairie and Little Lava Lake can produce some nice brook trout. Caddis adults and caddis emergers work well, but remember that brook trout are attracted to flies with red, so Royal Wulffs can be productive, too. A Parachute Adams can also be effective.

Take mosquito repellant when you fish here.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Deschutes River, Upper report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



East Lake

What to Expect in June:

Callibaetis are just starting their hatch cycle; the hatch will build strength with warmer weather and should soon be strong. The water near the East Lake Campground is a good spot to look for these mayflies to emerge at midday.

Other than Callibaetis imitations, midges, size 10 Mini Leeches, and size 6-10 Woolly Buggers are good patterns to show to trout.

Brown trout will prowl the shallow water during low light conditions, so don't stop fishing just because it's getting dark, and don't sleep in. Try large streamer patterns with sinking lines, and be very, very stealthy.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the East Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Fall River

What to Expect in June:

Midges will provide much of the action in June, with hatches occurring at midday. Try a Sprout Midge (aka "Sangre de Christo Midge," available in some shops) or a Griffiths Gnat or Renegade for the midges. You will probably need a 7X tippet and a downstream presentation. Resign yourself to the fact that you aren't going to catch every trout that sees your fly.

You might spot some caddis, so carry a few cream-bodied X Caddis in size 14 or 16.

On cool, cloudy days you may still see some blue-winged olives.

Fall River sees hatches of pale evening duns, pale morning duns, and green drakes at this time of year, so be on the look-out for them. Yellow sallies can also hatch here.

On this river and any other stream that is surrounded by big ponderosa pines, you can expect to find ants on the water--size 10 black flying ants, at this season. So carry a few ant patterns with you.

Small nymphs are always a good choice here: size 16-18 Pheasant Tails, Lightning Bugs, or anything with peacock herl, such as a Prince or Zug Bug. For a dry fly, it's hard to go too far wrong with a size 16 Parachute Adams on this river at this time of year.

Running a streamer pattern through the deep pools is a good June strategy, too.

Remember, the hatchery area is not the only place to fish. It's pretty and accessible, and they dump a bunch of really dumb trout in the water every week, but be adventurous and travel into the headwaters, or fish below the falls, or pull into any of the numerous turnouts between the headwaters and the hatchery.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Fall River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Grande Ronde River

What to Expect in June:

Steelhead won't arrive until mid-September.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Grande Ronde River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Hosmer Lake

What to Expect in June:

Expect good fishing, especially in the early part of the month, but as the crowds and fishing pressure increases, the fish will become more wary. When this happens, lengthen your leader to 15 feet, 6X, and concentrate your fishing during low-light times of day (dawn, dusk, cloudy days).

Callibaetis mayflies will start hatching in early June. A Callibaetis Cripple can be dynamite during the hatch, and a flashback Pheasant Tail produces well when slowly retrieved just subsurface.

As June moves along you'll have good fishing with damselfly patterns such as Dougs Damsel and Marabou Damsel. Midges will be important at dusk. Try a midge pupa pattern with the body fashioned from a wrapped stem of a peacock herl (strip all the fibers off, then wrap the stem on the shank.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Hosmer Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Klamath Lake

What to Expect in June:

This big lake starts to turn on in June. As the water warms up, trout will migrate north, and the Pelican Bay area can be excellent. Warmer weather also drives trout to the mouths of the Wood and Williamson river. Look for fish in the northern portion in and near Pelican Bay, Agency Lake, and the narrow water between Agency and Klamath lakes. Bring a boat or rent one from Rocky Point Resort.

Seal Buggers and Woolly Buggers in black, purple, or olive, plus Zonkers and damselfly patterns are good flies this month. Use an intermediate line; a floater is seldom useful here, and a faster sinking line will be into the weeds too quickly.

If you don't catch a fish in 15 minutes, MOVE. These trout are highly mobile. Even if you've found a hot spot, fishing can suddenly quit. When it does, move to a new place.

By the end of the month, the lake will start to get "soupy" as algae growth takes over. This will concentrate trout even more in the Rocky Point area, in the spring creeks that feed Pelican Bay, and at the mouths of the Wood and Williamson rivers.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Klamath Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Klamath River

What to Expect in June:

The Keno stretch of the Klamath is open until June 15. If the dam output is under 1,200 cfs, this is a good fishery. When fishing in the Keno section, toss big, black, weighted flies, such as Rubber Legs or Woolly Buggers. Use trout indicator or tight line tactics and dead-drift them past boulders, current seams, and any place the water slows or deepens. If the water is low (around 500 cfs) you can do well with streamers on a surface swing.

The Boyle Dam area (between the dam and the powerhouse) has good salmonfly and golden stonefly action in June--flows permitting--but the fish are not large.

Below the Boyle powerhouse, in the Frain Ranch area, trout are numerous and eager for salmonflies this month. After the big stoneflies, expect hatches of yellow sallies near the end of the month. After that, the hoppers start up. You can fish a size 10 yellow Stimulator in the Frain Ranch section for the next three months. But if you'd like to cast something other than a yellow Stimulator, try a caddis pupa patterns, such as a Sparkle Pupa. Dead-drift it near the bottom.

Erratic flows can occur in this section, but trout are used to the fluctuations and it shouldn't interfere with your fishing too much. Fish will be more spread out when the flows are high. Between the dam and the powerhouse, fishing is easier and flows more stable.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Klamath River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Lava Lake

What to Expect in June:

Midges will provide most of the action until Callibaetis hatches start in early June. Focus on the north and west shores where there are weed beds and shoreside reeds. Thin green or rust colored streamers can be productive. Prince Nymphs and Carey Specials can also work well.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Lava Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Mann Lake

What to Expect in June:

Not a summer fishery. Come back in the fall.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Mann Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



McKenzie River

What to Expect in June:

You can expect the McKenzie to be in good shape for most of June, but remember that a storm or hot weather can always raise the river. So watch the levels carefully; steady, high water is okay if it is not muddy, but big spikes will slow the fishing until the river is steady for a few days.

The McKenzie green caddis (genus Arctopsyche) should still be around in early June. Trout get so focused on that bug that they will ignore other hatches, no matter how massive they are.

After the big McKenzie caddis are gone, trout may still take imitations out of habit. But once they get their little pea-sized minds wrapped around the notion that the big bugs are gone, they'll turn to other bugs. The major hatches this month are caddis in size 14-16, pale morning duns, and yellow sallies. Soft Hackles are always a good choice here, as they are in any caddis-rich river. You may find some green drakes in the upper reaches. Golden stoneflies are present at this time of year, too.

By mid-June the McKenzie is into the "small insect" time of year in the lower river (below Blue River. By that time of year, there are a few green drakes and green caddis left, but most of them are gone. Size 12-18 caddis and size 18 pale morning duns are the name of the game at this time. Trout have been surface oriented for several months; since they're looking up, give them surface and near-surface patterns, such as dry flies and Soft Hackles, respectively. Present the latter with a surface swing.

Some steelhead should be in the river below Leaburg Dam. When the river is high, indicator tactics work best. As the river drops, traditional tactics will work better.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the McKenzie River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Metolius River

What to Expect in June:

Early June is green drake time here. Most green drake hatches are short--under an hour--and occur sometime between 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. although you might see some bugs as early as 1:00. Try a Green Drake Paradrake or a Green Drake Cripple during the hatch, and a Poxyback Green Drake before it begins. Look for hatches from the Wizard Falls area down to Bridge 99 and below.

During a green drake hatch, the best strategy is NOT to blind cast your dry fly. Wait for a trout to rise, then cast to that trout. On the other hand, if there isn't a hatch, you might do well by blind casting a green drake imitation to places where you THINK trout are lying. This strategy can work in the late afternoon when trout are thinking there might be some drakes around.

Pale morning duns arrive in May; they will stage strong hatches all month. Hatches will occur sometime between 11:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Hatches can come in waves throughout the day. If you're on the river and see a hatch from 11:00 to noon, and then it fades out--don't leave: another hatch may start a couple of hours later. Good patterns include PMD Cripples, Parachute PMDs, CDC Cripples, and Sparkle Duns, all in size 18. Use a 6X tippet and approach the fish with care.

It's too early for the golden stonefly adults on this river, but the nymphs will be active this month and you can do well with a Kaufmanns Stonefly or other size 8 stonefly nymph.

On cool mornings you may find trout feeding on midges.

Caddis will be hatching in the afternoon and around dusk. Carry size 14-16 olive and size 16-18 tan Elk Hair Caddis or X Caddis. Spinner falls of pale morning duns can also be expected, so carry some size 18 Rusty Spinners for the dusk hours.

Small stoneflies--yellow sallies and little green stoneflies--as well as ant patterns are also worth carrying; these are an opportunity, not a hatch.

When the weather pattern fluctuates between sunny-and-warm and cloudy-and-cool--as it will for much of June--fish can be moody and your success can be unpredictable.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Metolius River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Owyhee River, Lower

What to Expect in June:

Try beadhead nymphs, such as beadhead Princes or Pheasant Tails, in the riffly areas where the rainbow trout hang out. Expect hatches of caddis in the fast water, and pale morning duns and midges in the slow water sections. The slow water areas can also have Callibaetis hatches.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Owyhee River, Lower report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Rogue River, Upper

What to Expect in June:

Some summer steelhead always move into the river in June, but the real fishing for these big migratory rainbows won't start until August. This month, the primary action will be trout fishing on the short fly-fishing-only "Holy Water" section just below Lost Creek Dam, where the salmonfly hatch lasts most of the month.

The best salmonfly fishing is near dusk as egg-laying females drop to the river in big numbers and trout go nuts. Anglers go nuts, too, and this is a crowded fishery. Most folks do it wrong: they cast and cast and cast, and never take a break until they pack up for home. You're better off to stake out your patch of water (anglers are usually just a cast apart), and cast a MacSalmon or Clarks Stonefly to a rising fish whose position you know (and can cast to) precisely; use a downstream presentation. After you've caught a fish (or cast enough to put down all the trout within range), stop fishing until trout are once more actively rising in front of you. If you do this, you'll spend less time fishing, but you'll catch more fish.

Trout in the upper river (below the Holy Water section) are not large, but they are active and aggressive at this time. Skating, swinging, and drifting attractor patterns is effective. Don't even THINK of trying to fish near where the salmon anglers are fishing, especially if they're bank anglers; you'd be lucky to escape with your life.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Rogue River, Upper report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Sandy River

What to Expect in June:

Some summer steelhead enter the Sandy in June. Warm weather can render the river silty, in which case fishing will be poor.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Sandy River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Umpqua River, North Fork

What to Expect in June:

Small numbers of summer-run fish arrive in the North Umpqua in late June; the bulk of the run starts to arrive in July.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Umpqua River, North Fork report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Williamson River

What to Expect in June:

The usual size 10-12 Woolly Buggers and leech patterns should take trout, as well as a small olive stonefly imitation. Expect evening caddis hatches. Choose patterns such as an X Caddis for slow water or an Elk Hair Caddis for faster water. These hatches are of interest to resident (smaller) trout; for the big migratory trout, you need to go subsurface.

At the beginning of June, look for a hatch of gray drakes (aka black drakes) on the upper river above Klamath Marsh. Access is tricky due to private property.

If the weather is hot, we could see Hexagenia hatches in the slower water below Chiloquin near the end of June, but this hatch doesn't usually start until early July.

Not many fish move out of Klamath Lake and into the Williamson until early July, but if we have an extended hot spell, they might start upriver in late June. The Williamson's resident trout will top 20 inches, however, and that should be enough to get the interest of most anglers.

If you're unfamiliar with the Williamson and want to catch its big rainbows, hire a guide. This is the most difficult river in Oregon to fly fish well. Fish often hang out around structure, and you can't spot that structure from the surface clues, like you can in most rivers. A guide can save you a lot of frustration and get you access through private property.

For more on June tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Williamson River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.



Central Region

What to Expect in June:

Laurence Lake is a good June choice. Woolly Buggers and the usual stillwater fare will take trout. Fishing is best when it isn't windy. Bring some ant patterns and fish them near the lakeshore near trees.

Three Creeks Lake near Sisters opens mid-month and should have good fishing.



Northeast Region

What to Expect in June:

June is a traditional time to float the John Day in search of smallmouth bass, but river levels and turbidity can be a problem if there is a storm. The John Day carries more sediment for its size than any other river in Oregon, and the river is capable of big increases in flow. When it rises two or three feet overnight, you'd swear half the silt in Oregon is going down the river. Flows over 5,000 cfs (Service Creek gage) are too high for good fishing; something under 3,000 cfs is preferred. On the other hand, you need about 2,000 cfs for drifting.

Poppers and baitfish patterns, such as a small silver Zonker or Clouser Minnow, work well.




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