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Oregon Forecast for March

By Scott Richmond

Oregon Rivers in General

What to Expect in March:


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If it's a typical March, we'll see a little of everything, from wet storms to mild, sunny days. Moral: watch the river levels and the weather forecasts. And don't trust the latter too much; somewhere in Oregon there is a tomb of the unknown fisherman, and the epitaph reads, "He believed the weather report."

Trout. Blue-winged olives will continue to hatch throughout the month, to the delight of trout and those who angle for them. Size 18-22 Baetis Cripples work well during hatches, as do Parachute Baetis. My personal favorite--a Sparkle Dun--seems to work most anywhere. In general, the best blue-winged olive action will be midday: 1:00-3:00 (standard time, not daylight). Cool, drippy days prolong and intensify the hatch, bringing more trout to the surface. Sometimes the best hatches occur when the weather is warming up after a couple of cold days.

If you want to fish outside the blue-winged olive hatch, tie on a size 18 gold-ribbed Hares Ear or a Pheasant Tail and drift it near the bottom during the pre-noon hours. The best way to get these small flies down on the bottom is to pinch a splitshot onto the leader or to use a tandem fly rig with a heavy fly such as a Rubber Legs on the point and the small fly on a dropper about 12 inches above it.

Runs of slow to moderate speed are best for the blue-winged olive nymphs, but the dry flies work best in backeddies. Post-hatch, try a Diving Baetis or Soft Hackle to pick up trout feeding on egg-laying females.

March browns will join the blue-wings on many rivers. A size 12-14 brown-bodied Comparadun or CDC Cripple is a good dry fly choice. During March brown hatches, look for feeding fish in the slow-to-moderate runs that are within about a hundred yards (upstream or downstream) of a good-sized riffle. Hatches start around 1:00-1:30 p.m., standard time.

The larvae of spotted caddis and green caddis continue to be on the trout menu. A Zug Bug or Prince nymph works. Look for current seams and slow water just below a riffle or drop-off, and dead drift your nymph through those spots.

Little brown stoneflies will also be present, but they're fading fast. Try a size 16 black Elk Hair Caddis near the bank, or a size 14 black Hares Ear near the bottom.

Midges are another staple of a trout's diet at this time of year. Look for midday hatches and use a midge pupa pattern or an adult pattern such as a Sprout Midge or Griffiths Gnat.

No matter where you pursue your trout, be sure to carry some size 14-16 Parachute Adams with you. They have saved my bacon on many rivers at this time of year. They will often take trout when no hatch is present and trout aren't evident near the surface. Sometimes, a size 14 Parachute Adams works wonders during a hatch of size 18 blue-winged olives. Go figure. Another generic pattern to carry is a size 16 brown Soft Hackle, which can pick up trout when presented with a surface swing.

Steelhead. Steelheading will continue to be an activity on rivers with strong runs of wild, native fish. Weather is still a factor, either if it's too dry or too wet. The adage is, "When rivers are high, fish high. When rivers are low, fish low." That means that when the flows are unseasonably low your best opportunities are farther down the river, near the mouth, where there is more water and steelhead are stacked up waiting to come in at the first sign of increased flows. Conversely, if the river is high, you'll find better water conditions farther upriver where fewer tributaries have added their loads of silt and water.

This month you're at least as likely to encounter a spawned-out "downstreamer" steelhead as a fresh one. Downstreamers favor slow water, so you can improve your odds of hooking bright, unspawned steelhead by keeping your fly out of those areas. Prime downstreamer water is just past a drop-off where a run starts, the slow water on the inside of current seams, and the slow water on the inside of riffle corners. Avoid those spots. All fish that are not fin-clipped should be allowed to continue their journey, whether it's upstream or down.

The best approach will be traditional tactics with a sink-tip line that gets the fly near the bottom, or indicator tactics. As the rivers warm up, you'll find swinging flies becomes more effective than when the water was cold.

Late in the month, some trout and most steelhead will get serious about spawning. When trout go on the spawn, I stop fishing nymphs near the bottom. Both need to be left alone to do their procreative thing. Also, watch out for redds, which can be identified as a clean patch of gravel among the algae-covered gravel. That's where the eggs are. Don't walk through a redd or fish over the trout that are hovering on or near it.



Oregon Lakes in General

What to Expect in March:


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Many lakes are closed until the fourth Saturday in April, and many others that are "open" all year are frozen over or are blocked by snow. But later this month the ice should start to leave, and there can be excellent fishing at ice-out.

In lakes or reservoirs with water (and trout), expect to find your fish in the shallower parts of the lake because those areas warm up first and are more likely to have food. Trout will be feeding on midges--look for hatches at midday--dragonfly and damselfly nymphs, and baitfish.

Other than a midge pattern, it's hard to go wrong with a Woolly Bugger or Seal Bugger on a slow sinking line, such as an intermediate or a Wet Cell II. A slow retrieve is usually best. Sometimes you can pick up fish at deeper levels, but in general you're better off to concentrate on the margins of the lakes and near weed beds. Lakes with cutthroat, such as Mann Lake, often have fish in very shallow areas---sometimes in water that hardly covers your ankles.

If you're on a lake that is partially covered with ice, cast a midge pupa pattern along the edge of the ice sheet. Midge pupae rise up under the ice, then wriggle to the open water. This concentrates them along the edge of the ice sheet, and that's where trout will cruise.

Spawning season is coming up for rainbow trout, so near the end of the month you'll find them in or not far from the inlet and outlet creeks, if they are wild fish. If you respect the fish and value the future of your sport, you'll leave them alone until they've spawned and recovered.

Non-wild rainbow trout in lakes with no spawning access will be stacked around rocky, gravelly areas. On some lakes, that means the boat ramp.




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Chickahominy Reservoir

What to Expect in March:

If the ice is gone, Chick can be good in March, but be ready for cold water. Midge patterns, Woolly Buggers, and such like are the staples at this time of year.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Chickahominy Reservoir report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Clackamas River

What to Expect in March:

The river sees a run of wild steelhead in March. Use traditional tactics, and Egg Flies indicator tactics, depending on the type of water. Use the latter along rocky areas near the bank where the water is two-four feet deep; the plug pullers, side drifters, and drift anglers usually don't fish those spots.

The stretch between the Feldheimer and Barton boat ramps has good fly water, and the Barton-Carver section is also decent. Below Carver there is less fly-friendly water. There is also good bank access near the two McIver Park boat ramps. Private property limits access to the Clackamas, so it is difficult for fly anglers to fish this river without a boat.

Look for a river stage of around 12.5-13.5 feet on the Estacada gage. After a major rain, the Clackamas drops and clears more slowly than other rivers in the area.

The Eagle Creek hatchery run (if there was one) will have peaked by early March and fades quickly (there is not much of a native run in this tributary). Eagle Creek clears quickly after a storm, unlike the mainstem Clackamas. You want to be there within 48 hours after a major rainstorm ends; the sooner the better. Use indicator tactics when fishing Eagle Creek. Look for places where the water slows and deepens or moves at moderate speed through a trough or slot.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Clackamas River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Crane Prairie Reservoir

What to Expect in March:

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For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Crane Prairie Reservoir report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Crooked River

What to Expect in March:

This month the trout should be interested in small midges, blue-winged olives, and scuds. Size 16-18 Scuds with an orange tint are always a good option (scuds get an orange-colored parasite in their body, and studies have proved that trout key-in on that feature). Dead drift your scud near the bottom, or slowly retrieve it in slow water.

Many Crooked River anglers use scud patterns that are too big. Size-16 and sometimes size-18 patterns will take more trout than size 12-14 flies.

During blue-winged olive hatches, try using a Parachute Baetis with an emerger pattern on a trailer behind it. Trout usually take the emerger.

Other good blue-winged olive choices are a Sparkle Dun, Baetis Cripple, or CDC Baetis. Before the hatch, dead-drift a size 18 Pheasant Tail or dark Hares Ear near the bottom. This strategy can also be productive during a hatch.

Size 18-22 midges are also on the menu here. When midges are active, try a size 20 Griffiths Gnat with a size 20 CDC Bubble Brassie on a dropper in slow water.

You should also be prepared for little brown stoneflies.

Good choices when fishing deep are a size 18 black Palomino Midge, a size 6-10 Cranefly Larva, an Egg Fly, or a Zug Bug. All of these should be dead-drifted near the river bottom..

Remember to move slowly along the river. It can be hard to spot feeding fish unless you slow down and scan the water carefully.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Crooked River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Davis Lake

What to Expect in March:

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For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Davis Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Deschutes River, Lower

What to Expect in March:

Blue-winged olives will be around all month, and will be an event through April. Expect the blue-wings to hatch around 1:00 p.m. (standard time). Slow runs and backeddies are the best places to find fish. For tips on backeddy fishing, see Three Quick Tips for Backeddies.

During a hatch, a size-18 olive Sparkle Dun, Parachute Baetis, or Comparadun should work well for you. If the hatch is intense, a slightly darker pattern will help you spot your fly among the naturals; the trout don't seem to mind the darker color.

The best hatches will be on overcast days, preferably with a light drizzle. This prolongs and intensifies the hatch, getting trout into a proper frame of mind to accept your imitation.

The Smurf Emerger is another option for blue-winged olive hatches. It's a fly developed especially for the Deschutes and is available at Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop in Maupin.

Outside the hatch times, a gold-ribbed Hares Ear or Pheasant Tail (size 18-20) presented near the bottom is a good tactic. Another good nymph pattern is the Zug Bug. It imitates drifting spotted caddis larvae, which are common in the upper 60 miles of the river.

Saddle-case caddis (Glossosoma) are very active this month. A size 16-18 creamy Sparkle Pupa can be productive when dead-drifted near the bottom. If caddis are hatching, this is the most likely genus.

A size-14 black Elk Hair Caddis or Parachute Black Stone should also be in your fly box. The little brown stoneflies are not a prolific hatch, but trout seldom ignores the adults. See Small Brown Stoneflies for details.

Egg Flies are another productive tactic at this time of year. The river has more whitefish than trout, and they spawn in winter. Trout will take roe that is drifting near the bottom.

March browns can become locally important about the second week of the month. A water temperature around 48-50 seems to get the March browns moving in numbers. A size 12-14 brown CDC Cripple or Comparadun works well during the hatch; Deschutes March browns have a tan or creamy underside, so pick your pattern accordingly. This is not a prolific hatch here, but some parts of the lower river have large pockets of March browns.

You may also see an occasional Skwala stonefly this month.

If you dredge a stonefly nymph on the bottom, you might pick up a spawned-out steelhead that is headed downstream. Let it go on its way.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Deschutes River, Lower report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Deschutes River, Upper

What to Expect in March:

Some little brown stoneflies can be expected in the Lower Bridge area near Terrebonne. Expect March browns to start hatching in the third or fourth week of March. Keeps tabs on what's happening; before you go, call a local source to make sure there's some bugs on the water.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Deschutes River, Upper report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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East Lake

What to Expect in March:

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For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the East Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Fall River

What to Expect in March:

Blue-winged olives and midges continue to make appearances, with blue-winged olive hatches starting between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Little brown stoneflies are also present. Fishing will be best on overcast days, and especially when the air temperature is in the mid-40s and it's drizzling just a bit. But if bad days bring out the bugs, nice days bring out the anglers, and the river gets pretty busy when the sun shines. Mid-week crowds are smaller.

Sprout Midges or Griffiths Gnats work during midge hatches. Size 22-26 micro patterns are the best choices. For the blue-winged olives, try Sparkle Duns, Baetis Cripples, and Parachute Baetis in size 20-22. You'll probably need a 7X tippet and a downstream presentation for both midge and blue-winged olive hatches.

Caddis may start showing up in March. Have some cream-bodied X Caddis in size 14 or 16 in your fly box, and tan size 10-12 patterns.

Remember, the river is still closed below the falls.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Fall River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Grande Ronde River

What to Expect in March:

Steelhead are still available near the hatchery. They're dark and not table fare, but they're not wild and the hatchery presumably has all they need, so you shouldn't feel too guilty about it.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Grande Ronde River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Hosmer Lake

What to Expect in March:

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For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Hosmer Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Klamath Lake

What to Expect in March:

Trout should be waking up later this month. Seal Buggers presented near the margins of Pelican Bay and the south end of the lake could be productive this month.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Klamath Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Klamath River

What to Expect in March:

When fishing the Keno stretch (below the dam) look for outflows that are under 1,200 cfs, with no big spikes. If flows are very low--under 500 cfs--you may do best if you present a streamer on a wet-fly swing. Otherwise, dead drift a large, dark fly, such as a Rubber Legs or Woolly Bugger, past rocks, along seams, and in pocket water.

The Frain Ranch stretch near the California border should fish well, with Net Builder, Czech Nymph, and other spotted caddis larva patterns accounting for some trout. Team those patterns with a stonefly nymph, such as a Rubber Legs or Kaufmanns Stonefly, and you'll up your chances. Small yellow or orange dry flies may also catch trout.

When the Keno and Frain Ranch sections are too high for fishing, try the "clearwater" section between the Boyle withdrawal and the Boyle powerhouse. Trout are small in there, but they're plentiful and dumb.

However, even if lows in the Keno and Boyle section are good, local farmers and ranchers may flood and drain their fields. This can make the water extremely turbid and fishing will be in the dumpster.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Klamath River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Lava Lake

What to Expect in March:

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For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Lava Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Mann Lake

What to Expect in March:

It's possible to have good fishing here at the end of March, if the weather warms up. When the ice first leaves, you'll find the lake's cutthroat in shallow water, so leave the boat at home. The fish have a tendency to school-up, so search the water carefully. If you see some subtle rises, you may have found a pod with dozens of big trout.

Patterns to carry include Woolly Buggers, size 16-18 Pheasant Tail nymphs, and midge patterns. Sometimes the best tactic is a Woolly Bugger fished from a sinking line and retrieved ultra-fast.

For a complete run-down on Mann Lake, see Mann Lake.

This is not an enjoyable destination when it's cold and windy, so check the weather carefully before heading over here.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Lakes in General report. See the Mann Lake report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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McKenzie River

What to Expect in March:

Most of the good fishing is in the lower river and in the Willamette below its confluence with the McKenzie. Look for midday hatches of March browns in moderately-paced water that is within a hundred yards or so of a good-sized riffle. Nymphs grow-up in the riffle, then migrate to quieter water (upstream or downstream) just before hatching. Size 12-14 brown Comparaduns and CDC Cripples work well during the hatch.

Besides the March browns, a few little brown stoneflies may be around, and watch for hatching or egg-laying caddis. The caddis tend to be present on sunny days when the March browns are no-shows. A size 16 Adams works dandy when the caddis are around. Sometimes it works great when NOTHING is around and NO trout are dimpling the surface; go figure.

Blue-winged olives are another March event here, so be prepared with Sparkle Duns and similar imitations. Sometimes a small, dark Soft Hackle will take trout when nothing works on the surface.

You'll need a boat to fish the McKenzie because private homes line the river banks.

The Willamette just below its confluence with the McKenzie is a popular March option. There are two nice drifts between Armitage Park and Harrisburg.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the McKenzie River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Metolius River

What to Expect in March:

As we get into the longer daylight and warmer days of March, you can expect more consistent hatches of blue-winged olives. Look for them around 1:00-1:30 (standard time). If they're hatching, toss a size 18 olive Sparkle Dun or Parachute Baetis.

Pre-hatch, try a stonefly nymph dead-drifted near the bottom, or (better) a two-fly rig with a stonefly nymph on the point and a Pheasant Tail Nymph or red Serendipity on a dropper.

Look, too, for Cinygmula mayflies. They hatch this time of year, and can be matched with a size-16 cream-colored Sparkle Dun. See Cinygmula Mayflies for details of this mayfly.

If you see big orange caddis flying around, don't assume you overslept and that it's now fall again. The Metolius sees some silver stripe caddis (an October caddis cousin) in the spring. Carry a few big, orange dry flies in size 8 with you, but pupa patterns, such as the Bird of Prey (available at The Fly Fisher's Place) work best.

March browns hatch here, too, if the weather is mild this month. But before you tie on a March brown imitation, make sure the trout are actually taking them. Just because it's hatching, it doesn't mean the trout care.

Midge hatches are still a factor in March. Red Serendipities and other pupa/larva pattern should be in your box. Watch hatches carefully: what you may think is a blue-winged olive hatch may actually be midges. Carry some Griffiths Gnats as well as Sprout Midges for a dry fly option.

With more daylight, anglers can fish longer and may run into some evening events. Look for size-16 caddis and falls of blue-winged olive spinners as dusk approaches.

Bull trout are still active. Target them now before they migrate to Lake Billy Chinook.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Metolius River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Owyhee River, Lower

What to Expect in March:

Look for hatches of blue-winged olives, as well as midge hatches and Skwala stoneflies. Leech and baitfish patterns, such as Marabou Leeches, Zonkers, and Matukas, can also entice the river's large brown trout. The best fishing will be in the slow-water stretches.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Owyhee River, Lower report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Rogue River, Upper

What to Expect in March:

Look for river levels of 2,000 cfs or less at Dodge Bridge. When flows look good, head for the river with some Egg Flies and Egg Sucking Leeches. Present them near the bottom, using indicator tactics for the former and traditional tactics for the latter.

The lower Rogue is also fishable, of course, and there are some nice fly-fishing runs in the Galice area.

On the Holy Water, look for blue-winged olive and midge hatches. You can also generate some grabs if you present a leech pattern on a surface swing. Good weather brings out the anglers, so don't expect to be alone.

March brown hatches can be very strong on this river, and trout fishing is allowed in the mainstem until the end of the month.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Rogue River, Upper report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Sandy River

What to Expect in March:

The Sandy sees a run of wild steelhead in March. The best fly fishing is between Dodge Park and Dabney Park. The area around Oxbow Park has good public access for bank anglers. Boaters will find easy water between Oxbow and Dabney, but the Dodge to Oxbow run has a couple of very tough rapids; this section isn't suited to hard boats such as McKenzie-style driftboats. Swing flies with traditional tactics.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Sandy River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Umpqua River, North Fork

What to Expect in March:

March is the best month for the North Umpqua's native winter steelhead. Fishing should be excellent if the river doesn't suddenly rise.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Umpqua River, North Fork report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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Williamson River

What to Expect in March:

Closed.

For more on March tactics and flies, see the Rivers in General report. See the Williamson River report for current conditions, hatches, guides, and other information.




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